Questões de Concursos de Inglês

Questões sobre Elementos gramaticais

Questão 1
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
Assembleia Legislativa/SP 2012 - FCC - Analista Legislativo - Taquígrafo
1
05/01/2012
 
Understand legal issues when using CBCT scans
 
by Stuart J. Oberman, USA
 
5
Dentists are legally and ethically obligated to do no harm
 
to their patients. Improper diagnosis after using a CBCT (cone-
 
beam computed tomography) does not align with this standard
 
because delay of diagnosis leads to delay of treatment. This is
 
not in the best interest of the patient because it can lead to an
10
inferior prognosis. Also, not every patient requires a CBCT scan;
 
therefore, it is the dentist’s responsibility to determine whether a
 
CBCT scan is necessary by using reasonable, careful judgment
 
in light of the patient’s medical and dental history and thorough
 
examination. The dentist should do a cost-benefit analysis
15
before requesting a CBCT scan. When doing so, the dentist
 
should consider whether the likely benefit to the patient exceeds
 
the ionizing radiation risk and the financial cost.
 
 
Dentists’ scope of legal responsibility to diagnose
20
 
When using CBCT, as with other diagnostic tools, the
 
dentist’s responsibility is not limited to the area of interest being
 
diagnosed or treated. The treating dentist is legally responsible
 
for diagnosing any disease that falls within the scope of the
25
dentist’s license, which is normally broad in scope,
 
encompassing all diseases and lesions of the jaw and related
 
structures. As for a dentist’s responsibility for diagnosing a
 
disease that falls outside the scope of the dentist’s license, the
 
answer is not clear. Thus, it is always a good idea to be cautious
30
and assume the responsibility to recognize any abnormality that
 
appears anywhere on the CBCT scan. If ...1ART... dentist is
 
unsure of ...2ART... scan results, he or she should consult with
 
...3ART... specialists in the field or refer ...4ART... patient to ...5ART...
 
specialist.
As lacunas ART 1 a ART 5 devem ser preenchidas, respectivamente, com

Questão 2
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
TCE/SP 2012 - FCC - Auxiliar de Fiscalização Financeira II
1
By JENNIFER STEINHAUER
 
Published: December 22, 2011
 
 
WASHINGTON − Under a deal reached between House and Senate leaders, the House will now approve as early as Friday the
5
two-month extension of a payroll tax holiday and unemployment benefits approved by the Senate last Saturday, and the Senate will
 
appoint members of a House-Senate conference committee to negotiate legislation to extend both benefits through 2012.
 
House Republicans − who rejected an almost identical deal on Tuesday − collapsed under the political rubble that has
 
accumulated over the week, much of it from their own party, worried that the blockade would do serious damage to their appeal to
 
voters.
10
The House speaker, John A. Boehner, announced the decision over the phone to members on Thursday, and did not permit the
 
usual back and forth that is common on such calls, enraging many of them.
 
After his conversation with lawmakers, the speaker conceded to reporters that it might not have been "politically the smartest
 
thing in the world" for House Republicans to put themselves between a tax cut and the 160 million American workers who would benefit
 
from it, and to allow President Obama and Congressional Democrats to seize the momentum on the issue.
15
The agreement ended a partisan fight that threatened to keep Congress and Mr. Obama in town through Christmas and was
 
just the latest of the bitter struggles over fiscal policy involving House conservatives, the president and the Democratic-controlled
 
Senate.
 
Under the deal, the employee's share of the Social Security payroll tax will stay at the current level, 4.2 percent of wages,
 
through Feb. 29. In the absence of Congressional action, it would revert to the usual 6.2 percent next month. The government will also continue paying unemployment insurance benefits under current policy through February. Without Congressional action, many of the
20
long-term unemployed would begin losing benefits next month.
 
In addition, under the agreement, Medicare will continue paying doctors at current rates for two months, averting a 27 percent
 
cut that would otherwise occur on Jan. 1.
 
The new deal makes minor adjustments to make it easier for small businesses to cope with the tax changes and prevents
 
manipulation of an employee's pay should the tax cut extension fail to go beyond two months.
25
Mr. Obama, who has reaped political benefits from the standoff, welcomed the outcome.
 
"This is good news, just in time for the holidays," he said in a statement. "This is the right thing [VERB 1] to strengthen our
 
families, grow our economy, and create new jobs. This is real money that will [VERB 2] a real difference in people's lives."
(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/23/us/politics/senate-republican-leader-suggests-a-payroll-tax-deal.html?_r=1&nl= todays hea dlines & emc=tha2&pagewanted=all)
The correct verb forms of VERB 1 and VERB 2 in the last paragraph are

Questão 3
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
TCE/SP 2012 - FCC - Auxiliar de Fiscalização Financeira II
1
October 04, 2007
 
 
Member countries will find valuable advice on how to reform their budgeting practices to improve the effectiveness and
 
efficiency of public expenditure in a major new work on performance budgeting produced by the Fiscal Affairs Department. The book,
5
Performance Budgeting: Linking Funding and Results (500pp), came off the presses of the top UK publisher Palgrave Macmillan in
 
September.
 
Edited by FAD staff member Marc Robinson, the book contains a comprehensive treatment of contemporary performance
 
budgeting practice and theory. In a series of thematic chapters and case studies, the book discusses:
 
− The key forms of performance budgeting which [TO IMPLEMENT] around the world − how they differ, and what they have in
10
common points.
 
− Lessons from the experience of governments around the world − ranging from OECD nations to developing, middle-income
 
and transition countries − about what forms of performance budgeting work, under what circumstances, and with what
 
implementation strategies.
 
− How successful performance budgeting can improve aggregate fiscal discipline.
15
− The information requirements of performance budgeting, and
 
− The links between performance budgeting and other budgeting and public management reforms.
 
Many of the contributors to this work are leaders in performance budgeting implementation in their countries. Others are
 
respected academics and technical experts from the International Monetary Fund and other international organizations. Countries
 
covered in the case studies include the UK, USA, Australia, France, Chile, Spain, Russia, Colombia and Ethiopia.
20
One major focus of the book is performance budgeting as a tool for improved expenditure prioritization − that is, for helping to
 
shift limited public resources to the services of greatest social benefit. A key finding is that this type of performance budgeting will only
 
work if the budget process is fundamentally changed so that top politicians and bureaucrats systematically consider expenditure
 
priorities when formulating the budget. This means more than just considering the priorities for new spending. It requires also having
 
mechanisms to systematically review existing spending programs to identify what is ineffective and low priority and can, therefore, be
25
cut. This is what countries such as Chile and the United Kingdom have successfully done, and the United States is currently attempting
 
to achieve with its Program Assessment Rating Tool instrument. Conversely, it is a mistake to believe that merely changing the budget
 
classification and developing performance indicators will in itself improve the allocation of resources in the budget.
(Adapted from http://blog-pfm.imf.org/pfmblog/2007/10/making-performa.html)
The correct form of [TO IMPLEMENT] is

Questão 4
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
TCE/SP 2012 - FCC - Auxiliar de Fiscalização Financeira II
1
October 04, 2007
 
 
Member countries will find valuable advice on how to reform their budgeting practices to improve the effectiveness and
 
efficiency of public expenditure in a major new work on performance budgeting produced by the Fiscal Affairs Department. The book,
5
Performance Budgeting: Linking Funding and Results (500pp), came off the presses of the top UK publisher Palgrave Macmillan in
 
September.
 
Edited by FAD staff member Marc Robinson, the book contains a comprehensive treatment of contemporary performance
 
budgeting practice and theory. In a series of thematic chapters and case studies, the book discusses:
 
− The key forms of performance budgeting which [TO IMPLEMENT] around the world − how they differ, and what they have in
10
common points.
 
− Lessons from the experience of governments around the world − ranging from OECD nations to developing, middle-income
 
and transition countries − about what forms of performance budgeting work, under what circumstances, and with what
 
implementation strategies.
 
− How successful performance budgeting can improve aggregate fiscal discipline.
15
− The information requirements of performance budgeting, and
 
− The links between performance budgeting and other budgeting and public management reforms.
 
Many of the contributors to this work are leaders in performance budgeting implementation in their countries. Others are
 
respected academics and technical experts from the International Monetary Fund and other international organizations. Countries
 
covered in the case studies include the UK, USA, Australia, France, Chile, Spain, Russia, Colombia and Ethiopia.
20
One major focus of the book is performance budgeting as a tool for improved expenditure prioritization − that is, for helping to
 
shift limited public resources to the services of greatest social benefit. A key finding is that this type of performance budgeting will only
 
work if the budget process is fundamentally changed so that top politicians and bureaucrats systematically consider expenditure
 
priorities when formulating the budget. This means more than just considering the priorities for new spending. It requires also having
 
mechanisms to systematically review existing spending programs to identify what is ineffective and low priority and can, therefore, be
25
cut. This is what countries such as Chile and the United Kingdom have successfully done, and the United States is currently attempting
 
to achieve with its Program Assessment Rating Tool instrument. Conversely, it is a mistake to believe that merely changing the budget
 
classification and developing performance indicators will in itself improve the allocation of resources in the budget.
(Adapted from http://blog-pfm.imf.org/pfmblog/2007/10/making-performa.html)
No texto, comprehensive significa

Questão 5
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
SEE/MG 2012 - FCC - Professor de Educação Básica -Língua Estrangeira Moderna/Inglês
1
By BRUCE FEILER
 
 
I [TO SET OUT] to spend my summer vacation online. A few things conspired to give me the idea. The first was the insistent
 
finger wagging one now encounters that the only way to spend quality time with one’s children is to disengage from technology.
5
The same day, my brother sent along a link for a new app (leafsnap) that allows users to identify trees by submitting photos of
 
leaves. What a smart way to juice that nature walk, I thought. The next day I saw a Twitter message from Pierre Omidyar (@pierre), the
 
eBay founder, in which he attached a photo and asked, “What is the name of this purple and white flower bush?” Seconds later he had
 
his answer: lilac.
 
Then my sister wrote to ask how she could identify the bird building a nest on her deck. “Take a picture and put it on Facebook,”
10
I said. “You’ll have an answer within the hour.” She bet me it wouldn’t work, but within 19 minutes two friends had confirmed it was a
 
Carolina wren.
 
I concocted a scheme. During weekends this summer, I would pursue the opposite of an unplugged vacation: I would check
 
screens whenever I could. Not in the service of work, but in the service of play. I would crowd-source new ideas for car games and
 
YouTube my picnic recipes. I would test the prevailing wisdom that the Internet spoils all the fun. With back-to-school fast approaching,
15
here’s my report.
 
For starters, the Web supplied an endless font of trivia and historical tidbits to enliven our days. I learned that a great debate still
 
rages over who was the “Benedict” in eggs Benedict; that ancient mythologists believed fish were so afraid of the ospreys that they
 
turned up their bellies in surrender; and that care packages like the one we sent my nephew at camp had their origins feeding starving
 
Europeans in World War II.
20
Online videos are another boon to summer. When my 6-year-old daughters were upset that we didn’t awaken them at midnight
 
to watch a brief light show on the Eiffel Tower, a quick trip to YouTube did the trick. My father used seaturtle.org to teach my girls how
 
sea turtles emerge from the Atlantic near our home on Tybee Island, Ga., and lay eggs. Injured turtles are implanted with G.P.S.
 
devices, allowing them to be tracked online. One surprising way that being plugged in improved our vacations was using newfangled
 
resources to solve oldfangled problems. Bugs, for one. I used the Internet to find a home remedy for the slugs eating my begonias
25
(broken eggshells).
 
The Web also helped give us the feeling that we saw people more than we did. While it’s fashionable to complain that we’re
 
overly connected, I still found an occasional, virtual interaction with a friend or family member to be as pleasant as running into them on
 
the beach. I texted with my 12-year-old nephew about geocaching when we get together. My kids Skyped with my parents about
 
learning to swim.
30
And our devices were lifesavers when my daughter Tybee took a spill and had to be hurried to the hospital for stitches. A friend
 
who took care of Tybee’s twin, Eden, e-mailed us a photo of her noshing on pizza to assure us she was fine. When Tybee got nervous,
 
the doctor asked her what movies she should download on her iPad for her son. And just before the procedure, I received a
 
heartwarming text: “Dear Tybee, you are such a brave girl, love Eden.”
(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/14/fashion/this-life-a-plugged-in-summer.html?pagewanted=all)
The modal could as used in how she could identify the bird indicates

Questão 6
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
SEE/MG 2012 - FCC - Professor de Educação Básica -Língua Estrangeira Moderna/Inglês
1
By BRUCE FEILER
 
 
I [TO SET OUT] to spend my summer vacation online. A few things conspired to give me the idea. The first was the insistent
 
finger wagging one now encounters that the only way to spend quality time with one’s children is to disengage from technology.
5
The same day, my brother sent along a link for a new app (leafsnap) that allows users to identify trees by submitting photos of
 
leaves. What a smart way to juice that nature walk, I thought. The next day I saw a Twitter message from Pierre Omidyar (@pierre), the
 
eBay founder, in which he attached a photo and asked, “What is the name of this purple and white flower bush?” Seconds later he had
 
his answer: lilac.
 
Then my sister wrote to ask how she could identify the bird building a nest on her deck. “Take a picture and put it on Facebook,”
10
I said. “You’ll have an answer within the hour.” She bet me it wouldn’t work, but within 19 minutes two friends had confirmed it was a
 
Carolina wren.
 
I concocted a scheme. During weekends this summer, I would pursue the opposite of an unplugged vacation: I would check
 
screens whenever I could. Not in the service of work, but in the service of play. I would crowd-source new ideas for car games and
 
YouTube my picnic recipes. I would test the prevailing wisdom that the Internet spoils all the fun. With back-to-school fast approaching,
15
here’s my report.
 
For starters, the Web supplied an endless font of trivia and historical tidbits to enliven our days. I learned that a great debate still
 
rages over who was the “Benedict” in eggs Benedict; that ancient mythologists believed fish were so afraid of the ospreys that they
 
turned up their bellies in surrender; and that care packages like the one we sent my nephew at camp had their origins feeding starving
 
Europeans in World War II.
20
Online videos are another boon to summer. When my 6-year-old daughters were upset that we didn’t awaken them at midnight
 
to watch a brief light show on the Eiffel Tower, a quick trip to YouTube did the trick. My father used seaturtle.org to teach my girls how
 
sea turtles emerge from the Atlantic near our home on Tybee Island, Ga., and lay eggs. Injured turtles are implanted with G.P.S.
 
devices, allowing them to be tracked online. One surprising way that being plugged in improved our vacations was using newfangled
 
resources to solve oldfangled problems. Bugs, for one. I used the Internet to find a home remedy for the slugs eating my begonias
25
(broken eggshells).
 
The Web also helped give us the feeling that we saw people more than we did. While it’s fashionable to complain that we’re
 
overly connected, I still found an occasional, virtual interaction with a friend or family member to be as pleasant as running into them on
 
the beach. I texted with my 12-year-old nephew about geocaching when we get together. My kids Skyped with my parents about
 
learning to swim.
30
And our devices were lifesavers when my daughter Tybee took a spill and had to be hurried to the hospital for stitches. A friend
 
who took care of Tybee’s twin, Eden, e-mailed us a photo of her noshing on pizza to assure us she was fine. When Tybee got nervous,
 
the doctor asked her what movies she should download on her iPad for her son. And just before the procedure, I received a
 
heartwarming text: “Dear Tybee, you are such a brave girl, love Eden.”
(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/14/fashion/this-life-a-plugged-in-summer.html?pagewanted=all)
The correct form of [TO SET OUT] is

Questão 7
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
SEE/MG 2012 - FCC - Professor de Educação Básica -Língua Estrangeira Moderna/Inglês
1
By Carolyn Hax
 
 
Hi, Carolyn:
 
So, I am getting married in a few months and I’ve been struggling with a question: How much financial information should a
5
couple share pre-wedding?
 
Recently my fiancé told me that an old creditor started garnishing a portion of his paycheck. I was shocked that his finances
 
were in such a bad state.
 
He has always been private about money, but I didn’t care much since I make my own living anyway. I’m just wondering if we
 
need to write out all our debts and share them with each other before marriage. If so, how do I approach this topic?
10
 
Anonymous
 
 
You tell him the garnished paycheck surprised you, and you think it’s important that both of you share full financial information −
 
including credit scores − then fully discuss your philosophies and approaches to money. This is critical given not just his neglected
15
debt, but also your casual attitude toward his being “private about money.”
 
If he won’t share, don’t marry. Seriously.
 
And if he does share what amounts to a real mess, then postpone the wedding until he sorts himself out. This isn’t about your
 
ability to support yourself, though that helps. It’s about the financial implications of the legal knot you’re about to tie. Unromantic, sure,
 
but losing a home/car, taking second or third jobs, never having a vacation and winding up in bankruptcy are all profoundly unromantic
20
as well.
 
(Adapted form http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/money-issues-arent-romantic-but-they-should-be-discussed-before-a-wed- ding-/2011/07/23/gIQAt2npBJ_story.html)
In the sentence He has always been private about money, the Present Perfect is

Questão 8
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
SEE/MG 2012 - FCC - Professor de Educação Básica -Língua Estrangeira Moderna/Inglês
1
A Memoir
 
By Binyavanga Wainaina
 
256 pp. Graywolf Press. $24.
 
5
Dear reader, I’ll save you precious time: skip this review and head directly to the bookstore for Binyavanga Wainaina’s stand-up-
 
and-cheer coming-of-age memoir, “One Day I Will Write About This Place.” [CONNECTIVE] written by an East African and set in East
 
and Southern Africa, Wainaina’s book is not just for Afrophiles or lovers of post-colonial literature. This is a book for anyone who still
 
finds the nourishment of a well-written tale preferable to the empty-calorie jolt of a celebrity confessional or Swedish mystery.
 
Not that Wainaina is likely to judge [PRONOUN] taste in books. In fact, at its heart, this is a story about how Wainaina was
10
almost [TO EAT] alive by his addiction to reading anything available. “I am starting to read storybooks,” he says of his 11-year-old self,
 
growing up in Nakuru, Kenya. “If words, in English, arranged on the page have the power to control my body in this world, this sound
 
and language can close its folds, like a fan, and I will slide into its world, where things are arranged differently.”
 
As he leaves childhood [ADVERB 1] − “My nose sweats a lot these days, and my armpits smell, and I wake [ADVERB 2] a lot at
 
night all wriggly and hot, like Congo rumba music” − Wainaina retreats further from the confusing realities of politics and adolescence
15
and his big multinational family (his father a Kenyan businessman and farm owner, his mother a Ugandan salon owner) and deeper
 
into a world of words. At school he is told, and believes, that he is supposed to become a doctor or a lawyer, an engineer or a scientist.
 
But Wainaina seems constitutionally incapable of absorbing anything that would further a career in these fields.
 
By the time Wainaina leaves Kenya to attend university in South Africa, a country smoldering with the last poisonous fumes of
 
apartheid, his addiction to books is complete. He drops out of school to pursue more completely a life of reading.
20
(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/14/books/review/one-day-i-will-write-about-this-place-by-binyavanga-wainaina-book-re- view.html?pagewanted=all)
The missing [ADVERB 2] is

Questão 9
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
SEE/MG 2012 - FCC - Professor de Educação Básica -Língua Estrangeira Moderna/Inglês
1
A Memoir
 
By Binyavanga Wainaina
 
256 pp. Graywolf Press. $24.
 
5
Dear reader, I’ll save you precious time: skip this review and head directly to the bookstore for Binyavanga Wainaina’s stand-up-
 
and-cheer coming-of-age memoir, “One Day I Will Write About This Place.” [CONNECTIVE] written by an East African and set in East
 
and Southern Africa, Wainaina’s book is not just for Afrophiles or lovers of post-colonial literature. This is a book for anyone who still
 
finds the nourishment of a well-written tale preferable to the empty-calorie jolt of a celebrity confessional or Swedish mystery.
 
Not that Wainaina is likely to judge [PRONOUN] taste in books. In fact, at its heart, this is a story about how Wainaina was
10
almost [TO EAT] alive by his addiction to reading anything available. “I am starting to read storybooks,” he says of his 11-year-old self,
 
growing up in Nakuru, Kenya. “If words, in English, arranged on the page have the power to control my body in this world, this sound
 
and language can close its folds, like a fan, and I will slide into its world, where things are arranged differently.”
 
As he leaves childhood [ADVERB 1] − “My nose sweats a lot these days, and my armpits smell, and I wake [ADVERB 2] a lot at
 
night all wriggly and hot, like Congo rumba music” − Wainaina retreats further from the confusing realities of politics and adolescence
15
and his big multinational family (his father a Kenyan businessman and farm owner, his mother a Ugandan salon owner) and deeper
 
into a world of words. At school he is told, and believes, that he is supposed to become a doctor or a lawyer, an engineer or a scientist.
 
But Wainaina seems constitutionally incapable of absorbing anything that would further a career in these fields.
 
By the time Wainaina leaves Kenya to attend university in South Africa, a country smoldering with the last poisonous fumes of
 
apartheid, his addiction to books is complete. He drops out of school to pursue more completely a life of reading.
20
(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/14/books/review/one-day-i-will-write-about-this-place-by-binyavanga-wainaina-book-re- view.html?pagewanted=all)
The missing [ADVERB 1] is

Questão 10
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
SEE/MG 2012 - FCC - Professor de Educação Básica -Língua Estrangeira Moderna/Inglês
1
A Memoir
 
By Binyavanga Wainaina
 
256 pp. Graywolf Press. $24.
 
5
Dear reader, I’ll save you precious time: skip this review and head directly to the bookstore for Binyavanga Wainaina’s stand-up-
 
and-cheer coming-of-age memoir, “One Day I Will Write About This Place.” [CONNECTIVE] written by an East African and set in East
 
and Southern Africa, Wainaina’s book is not just for Afrophiles or lovers of post-colonial literature. This is a book for anyone who still
 
finds the nourishment of a well-written tale preferable to the empty-calorie jolt of a celebrity confessional or Swedish mystery.
 
Not that Wainaina is likely to judge [PRONOUN] taste in books. In fact, at its heart, this is a story about how Wainaina was
10
almost [TO EAT] alive by his addiction to reading anything available. “I am starting to read storybooks,” he says of his 11-year-old self,
 
growing up in Nakuru, Kenya. “If words, in English, arranged on the page have the power to control my body in this world, this sound
 
and language can close its folds, like a fan, and I will slide into its world, where things are arranged differently.”
 
As he leaves childhood [ADVERB 1] − “My nose sweats a lot these days, and my armpits smell, and I wake [ADVERB 2] a lot at
 
night all wriggly and hot, like Congo rumba music” − Wainaina retreats further from the confusing realities of politics and adolescence
15
and his big multinational family (his father a Kenyan businessman and farm owner, his mother a Ugandan salon owner) and deeper
 
into a world of words. At school he is told, and believes, that he is supposed to become a doctor or a lawyer, an engineer or a scientist.
 
But Wainaina seems constitutionally incapable of absorbing anything that would further a career in these fields.
 
By the time Wainaina leaves Kenya to attend university in South Africa, a country smoldering with the last poisonous fumes of
 
apartheid, his addiction to books is complete. He drops out of school to pursue more completely a life of reading.
20
(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/14/books/review/one-day-i-will-write-about-this-place-by-binyavanga-wainaina-book-re- view.html?pagewanted=all)
The correct form of [TO EAT] in the above text is

Questão 11
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
Câmara dos Deputados 2012 - CESPE - Arquiteto
1
Privacy groups and lawmakers are calling for a new and
 
broader investigation into Google and its privacy practices after
 
the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
 
announced that it found no evidence that the company broke
5
eavesdropping laws.
 
Late last week, the FCC reported that there was no legal
 
precedent to find fault with Google collecting unprotected
 
home Wi-Fi data, such as personal email, passwords and search
 
histories, with its roaming Street View cars between 2007 and
10
2010. However, the FCC did fine Google $ 25,000 for
 
obstructing its investigation.
 
The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), a
 
national privacy watchdog, disagreed with the FCC findings. In
 
a letter sent to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder today, EPIC
15
asked that the Department of Justice investigate Google’s
 
surreptitious collecting of Wi-Fi data from residential networks.
 
U.S. Rep. Edward J. Markey, a senior member of the U.S.
 
House Energy and Commerce Committee, has also stepped into
 
the fray.
20
“The circumstances surrounding Google’s siphoning of
 
personal information leave many unanswered questions,”
 
Markey said today in an email to Computerworld. “I believe
 
Congress should immediately hold a hearing to get to the
 
bottom of this serious situation.”
Internet: <www.computerworld.com> (adapted).
Based on the text above it can be said that.
“fray” (5.19) is synonymous with fighting.
Questão 12
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
Câmara dos Deputados 2012 - CESPE - Arquiteto
1
Privacy groups and lawmakers are calling for a new and
 
broader investigation into Google and its privacy practices after
 
the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
 
announced that it found no evidence that the company broke
5
eavesdropping laws.
 
Late last week, the FCC reported that there was no legal
 
precedent to find fault with Google collecting unprotected
 
home Wi-Fi data, such as personal email, passwords and search
 
histories, with its roaming Street View cars between 2007 and
10
2010. However, the FCC did fine Google $ 25,000 for
 
obstructing its investigation.
 
The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), a
 
national privacy watchdog, disagreed with the FCC findings. In
 
a letter sent to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder today, EPIC
15
asked that the Department of Justice investigate Google’s
 
surreptitious collecting of Wi-Fi data from residential networks.
 
U.S. Rep. Edward J. Markey, a senior member of the U.S.
 
House Energy and Commerce Committee, has also stepped into
 
the fray.
20
“The circumstances surrounding Google’s siphoning of
 
personal information leave many unanswered questions,”
 
Markey said today in an email to Computerworld. “I believe
 
Congress should immediately hold a hearing to get to the
 
bottom of this serious situation.”
Internet: <www.computerworld.com> (adapted).
Based on the text above it can be said that.
“surreptitious” (5.16) is synonymous with concealed.
Questão 13
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
Câmara dos Deputados 2012 - CESPE - Arquiteto
1
Technology-related legislation can have a huge impact
 
on growing businesses, and some interesting issues are likely
 
to pop up with the new Congress of the United States this year.
 
Of great interest to growing businesses are the topics of data
5
protection and net neutrality.
 
Laws that lay out more stringent requirements for
 
retaining and protecting employee and customer data could be
 
on the horizon. “The laws that apply to big business are going
 
to trickle down to small business,” says Ann Westerheim,
10
founder and president of technology consulting firm Ekaru.
 
“Businesses need to have that on their radar. You don’t want to
 
get hit with a fine because you’re not complying.” She suggests
 
looking at laws like Sarbanes-Oxley to get an idea of where
 
new tech laws could be heading.
15
The good news is that proper data protection is
 
something businesses should be doing anyway. “A lot of the
 
measures required to protect employee and customer data are
 
just good business practices,” says Westerheim. Growing
 
businesses can head off potential compliance costs by gradually
20
shoring up their IT security and data protection now.
 
Net neutrality is likely to be a hot issue again after
 
stalling in the Senate last year. Net neutrality proponents want
 
regulations to prevent network providers from prioritizing
 
certain Internet traffic. “Net neutrality is a big issue for small
25
businesses,” says Westerheim. A net neutrality law stands a
 
better chance of passing with strong Democratic backing this
 
year, but it figures to be a hard-fought battle. Digital copyright
 
issues could also come to the fore in Congress. With the
 
changes brought about by the last election, it will be an
30
interesting year for entrepreneurs to keep an eye on the
 
goings-on in Washington.31
Internet: <www.microsoft.com>.
Judge the following items according to the text above.
The word “entrepreneurs” (5.30) can be defined as people who organizes, operates, and assumes the risk for a business venture.
Questão 14
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
Câmara dos Deputados 2012 - CESPE - Arquiteto
1
Technology-related legislation can have a huge impact
 
on growing businesses, and some interesting issues are likely
 
to pop up with the new Congress of the United States this year.
 
Of great interest to growing businesses are the topics of data
5
protection and net neutrality.
 
Laws that lay out more stringent requirements for
 
retaining and protecting employee and customer data could be
 
on the horizon. “The laws that apply to big business are going
 
to trickle down to small business,” says Ann Westerheim,
10
founder and president of technology consulting firm Ekaru.
 
“Businesses need to have that on their radar. You don’t want to
 
get hit with a fine because you’re not complying.” She suggests
 
looking at laws like Sarbanes-Oxley to get an idea of where
 
new tech laws could be heading.
15
The good news is that proper data protection is
 
something businesses should be doing anyway. “A lot of the
 
measures required to protect employee and customer data are
 
just good business practices,” says Westerheim. Growing
 
businesses can head off potential compliance costs by gradually
20
shoring up their IT security and data protection now.
 
Net neutrality is likely to be a hot issue again after
 
stalling in the Senate last year. Net neutrality proponents want
 
regulations to prevent network providers from prioritizing
 
certain Internet traffic. “Net neutrality is a big issue for small
25
businesses,” says Westerheim. A net neutrality law stands a
 
better chance of passing with strong Democratic backing this
 
year, but it figures to be a hard-fought battle. Digital copyright
 
issues could also come to the fore in Congress. With the
 
changes brought about by the last election, it will be an
30
interesting year for entrepreneurs to keep an eye on the
 
goings-on in Washington.31
Internet: <www.microsoft.com>.
Judge the following items according to the text above.
In the text, the verb to comply, in ‘You don’t want to get hit with a fine because you’re not complying’ (5.11-12), means to act in accordance with.
Questão 15
Matéria: Inglês
Assunto: Elementos gramaticais
Câmara dos Deputados 2012 - CESPE - Arquiteto
1
Technology-related legislation can have a huge impact
 
on growing businesses, and some interesting issues are likely
 
to pop up with the new Congress of the United States this year.
 
Of great interest to growing businesses are the topics of data
5
protection and net neutrality.
 
Laws that lay out more stringent requirements for
 
retaining and protecting employee and customer data could be
 
on the horizon. “The laws that apply to big business are going
 
to trickle down to small business,” says Ann Westerheim,
10
founder and president of technology consulting firm Ekaru.
 
“Businesses need to have that on their radar. You don’t want to
 
get hit with a fine because you’re not complying.” She suggests
 
looking at laws like Sarbanes-Oxley to get an idea of where
 
new tech laws could be heading.
15
The good news is that proper data protection is
 
something businesses should be doing anyway. “A lot of the
 
measures required to protect employee and customer data are
 
just good business practices,” says Westerheim. Growing
 
businesses can head off potential compliance costs by gradually
20
shoring up their IT security and data protection now.
 
Net neutrality is likely to be a hot issue again after
 
stalling in the Senate last year. Net neutrality proponents want
 
regulations to prevent network providers from prioritizing
 
certain Internet traffic. “Net neutrality is a big issue for small
25
businesses,” says Westerheim. A net neutrality law stands a
 
better chance of passing with strong Democratic backing this
 
year, but it figures to be a hard-fought battle. Digital copyright
 
issues could also come to the fore in Congress. With the
 
changes brought about by the last election, it will be an
30
interesting year for entrepreneurs to keep an eye on the
 
goings-on in Washington.31
Internet: <www.microsoft.com>.
Judge the following items according to the text above.
The phrasal verb “lay out” (5.6) could be correctly replaced in the text by avoid.
Esse tópico também aparece nos editais com os seguintes nomes:
  • - Domínio instrumental de estruturas gramaticais e vocabulário, em sua morfologia e semântica
  • - Inglês técnico
  • - Aspectos gramaticais
  • - Compreensão de textos escritos em língua inglesa e itens gramaticais relevantes para o entendimento dos sentidos dos textos.
  • - Itens gramaticais relevantes para a compreensão do conteúdo
  • - Itens gramaticais relevantes para a compreensão de conteúdos semânticos
  • - Itens gramaticais relevantes para a compreensão dos conteúdos semânticos
  • - Elementos gramaticais
  • - Gramática para a compreensão de conteúdos semânticos
  • - Itens gramaticais relevantes para o entendimento dos sentidos dos textos
  • - Aspectos gramaticais relevantes para a compreensão de textos em língua inglesa
  • - Aspectos linguísticos
  • - Inglês
  • - Inglês Técnico
  • - Elementos Gramaticais
 
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Assuntos de Questões sobre Elementos gramaticais:
Compreensão de textos